Food

#1056 Skip the plastic; wrap mine in Abeego, please

Abeego

Abeego in action; from the company’s Facebook page

A Victoria, British Columbia woman has invented a product with the potential to put an end to those rolls of plastic that offer convenience and pollution all in one rectangular box. Toni Desrosiers came up with the idea of Abeego by looking back in time. She discovered pre-plastic storage options had two characteristics in common. They were natural and breathable.

On her “Our Story” page, Desrosiers describes the ground rules she set for herself in developing her storage wrap:

  • All ingredients used will be completely natural.
  • No chemical alteration will be needed for the material to be effective.
  • Each selected ingredient will have been used for preservation at some stage in human history.
  • All ingredients have natural characteristics suitable for keeping food fresh.
  • All ingredients are already approved by the FDA for food contact.

The sheets and bags she developed are made from hemp and impregnated with beeswax, tree resin and jojoba oil. I’m not giving away any trade secrets here. It is all laid out on the Web site.

Those little balls of crinkled-up, indestructible plastic wrap will be around for a long time. Abeego, on the other hand, has a usable life of roughly a year. Wrap your cheese, bread, greens and other food items in it. Expect longer storage than plastic can provide.

Eat the contents. Use a little mild soap and cold water to clean your Abeego. Use again. Gently clean again. Use again. And then pop it into your compost heap and watch it gradually crumble into soil.

A lot of retailers carry Abeego now. Not one of them is in my foodie-paradise of a home town. That has got to change. In the meantime, I can buy them from the Web site.

Congratulations to Abeego for being a finalist in the Business Development Bank of Canada’s 2014 Young Entrepreneur Awards. The 2nd-place spot won the company $25,000 in consulting services.

This is the kind of innovative, creative solution to a practical challenge and an environmental ill that gives me hope.

You can follow Abeego on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube

Jenny Lee wrote a good article about Abeego for the Vancouver Sun.

Share

#1048 Teen writes climate-saving cookbook

Emily Abrams

Emily Abrams; photo clip from video below

Seriously, think back to your teen years. Were you trying to save the world? This young woman is not waiting for anyone else. She is starting now.

High school-senior Emily Abrams understands the dangers of climate change and the link between what we choose to eat and our impact on the planet. So she contacted some of the best chefs in America and asked for their climate-friendly recipes.

The result is a cookbook whose title is a plea, “Don’t Cook the Planet.”

Abrams grew up in an environmentally savvy family. They must be incredibly proud.


Amazon US, Amazon Canada or your public library

Share

#992 An orchard blooms in the heart of Vancouver

Copley Community Orchard

When the burgeoning city of Vancouver swallowed the Copley family’s orchard, the likelihood of fruit trees ever thriving there again probably seemed remote. But young people with a passion for the environment are taking a piece of that land back…

Share